Category Archives: Event

Kathy Cramer, director of the Morgridge Center for Public Service and professor of political science, is pictured in her office at the Red Gym (Armory and Gymnasium) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on July 1, 2015. (Photo by Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)

Katherine Cramer : The Politics of Resentment in the Contemporary United States

Tuesday
November 14, 2017
3:30–5:00
Reception will follow Campbell 153

Katherine Cramer is a professor in the Department of Political Science and Director of the Morgridge Center for Public Service. Her work focuses on the way people in the United States make sense of politics and their place in it. She is known for her innovative approach to the study of public opinion, in which she invites herself into the conversations of groups of people to listen to the way they understand public affairs. Her book, The Politics of Resentment: Rural Consciousness in Wisconsin and the Rise of Scott Walker, examines rural resentment toward cities and its implications for contemporary politics (University of Chicago Press, 2016). She has also published as Katherine Cramer Walsh and is the author of Talking about Race: Community Dialogues and the Politics of Difference, and Talking about Politics: Informal Groups and Social Identity in American Life. She is the recipient of the 2017 APSA Qualitative and Multi-Method Research section Giovanni Sartori Award for the best book developing or using qualitative methods published in 2016, among other awards.

Kathy Cramer, director of the Morgridge Center for Public Service and professor of political science, is pictured in her office at the Red Gym (Armory and Gymnasium) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on July 1, 2015. (Photo by Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)

Katherine Cramer: Expanding the Study of Public Opinion to Incorporate Qualitative Methods

Expanding the Study of Public Opinion to Incorporate Qualitative MethodsWednesday
November 15, 2017
11:30
Informal Lunch
Gibson 296

Lunch discussion of the use of qualitative methods for the study of public opinion, and in the social sciences more generally.

Katherine Cramer is a professor in the Department of Political Science and Director of the Morgridge Center for Public Service. Her work focuses on the way people in the United States make sense of politics and their place in it. She is known for her innovative approach to the study of public opinion, in which she invites herself into the conversations of groups of people to listen to the way they understand public affairs. Her book, The Politics of Resentment: Rural Consciousness in Wisconsin and the Rise of Scott Walker, examines rural resentment toward cities and its implications for contemporary politics (University of Chicago Press, 2016). She has also published as Katherine Cramer Walsh and is the author of Talking about Race: Community Dialogues and the Politics of Difference, and Talking about Politics: Informal Groups and Social Identity in American Life. She is the recipient of the 2017 APSA Qualitative and Multi-Method Research section Giovanni Sartori Award for the best book developing or using qualitative methods published in 2016, among other awards.

Lawrie Balfour

Lawrie Balfour: Where Do We Go From Here?: Martin Luther King, Jr., Reparations, and Emancipation Today

Lawrie BalfourFriday, November 3, 2017
3:30-5:00
Nau Hall Room 101

America owes a debt of justice which it has only begun to pay.”
—Martin Luther King, Jr.

King made this statement after the landmark Civil Rights legislation of the 1960s. His rejection of the idea that legal change was enough to undo the past, present, and future harms of white supremacy speaks to us today. Focusing on Where Do We Go From Here, this talk will explore King’s philosophy of time and indebtedness. It will make a case for reparations as a way to come to terms with the past and fulfill our obligations to future generations whose inheritance is in our hands.

Robert Vitalis

Robert Vitalis – Lunch Talk: White World Order, Black Power Politics: Race in the Making of American International Relations

Robert VitalisWed, October 18
12:30pm – 2:00pm
New Cabell Hall, Room 236

Robert Vitalis has taught political science at the University of Pennsylvania since 1999. The London Guardian named his America’s Kingdom: Mythmaking on the Saudi Oil Frontier, a book of the year in 2006. His last book, White World Order, Black Power Politics (Cornell University Press, 2015) moved away from the Middle East to explore the unwritten history of racism and imperialism in American disciplinary international relations and the recovery of its critical “Howard School” tradition. He is on sabbatical in 2017-2018 while working on a new book, Oilcraft: Folkways of Imperialism and Antiimperialism in the Twenty First Century, forthcoming from Stanford University Press.

Preston Reynolds

Preston Reynolds – Eugenics at UVA and Its Impact on Race and Gender Inequity

Preston ReynoldsWednesday, September 27
3:30pm – 5:00pm
Minor Hall 125

Eugenics permeated the culture of the University of Virginia for over 100 years through the research, writings, and teaching of some of its most prominent leaders. Eugenics laid the intellectual foundation for discrimination with regard to race, gender, nationality, intellectual ability, and socio-economic status. The impact of the eugenics metaphor was felt in every aspect of life, and in every corner of the Commonwealth, in part, through the work of UVA faculty, and their collaboration with nationally renowned eugenicists. This lecture will explore the history of eugenics at UVA, reflect on the damage the eugenics paradigm had on diversity and health disparities, and outline areas of future research.

Watch the lecture here, or check out our library of videos on Facebook:

Eugenics at the University of Virginia & Its Impact on Race an…

Preston Reynolds, MD, PhD at the University of Virginia Department of Medicine"Eugenics at the University of Virginia & Its Impact on Race and Gender Inequity"

Posted by Power Violence and Inequality on Wednesday, September 27, 2017

 

Preston Reynolds, MD, PhD, is nationally recognized as a scholar, physician, educator, and activist leader. She teaches and conducts research on professionalism, global health and human rights, health disparities, and the history of race discrimination in health care and health professions education in the US. Professor Reynolds currently serves as faculty in the Carter G. Woodson Institute, Associate Director of the Center for Health Disparities, and Associate Chair for Professionalism and Diversity in the Department of Medicine.


See also these articles about the renaming of UVa buildings formerly named for prominent eugenicists:

https://www.news.virginia.edu/content/pinn-hall-dedication-highlights-namesake-and-future-medical-research

https://www.news.virginia.edu/content/uvas-lewis-house-renamed-yen-house-honor-noted-chinese-graduate

PVI Mini Conference

PVI Fellows Mini-Conference

PVI Mini ConferenceFriday, May 5, 2017
8:30–1:45
236 New Cabell Hall

8:30-9:00 Continental Breakfast

9:00-9:15 Welcome
PVI co-Directors, Denise Walsh and Nicholas Winter

9:15-9:30 Opening Remarks
Professor Charlotte Patterson, Psychology and Women, Gender & Sexuality

9:30-11:00 PVI Fellows Panel
Communicating Power, Violence & Inequality
Annie Galvin, Kara Fitzgibbon, Dannah Dennis, Kelli Shermeyer Discussant: Camilla Fojas, Associate Professor of Media Studies

11-11:15 Coffee break

11:15-12:45 PVI Fellows Panel
Education, Power, Violence & Inequality
Kimalee Dickerson, Brooke Dinsmore, Jennifer Poole, Andrew Frankel
Discussant: Rachel Wahl, Assistant Professor, Curry School

12:45-1:45 Panel
Ethics: Eugenics and its Legacy at UVA Today*
Daniel Cavanaugh, Health Sciences Library
Caitlyn Dreisbach, RN Clinician
Kathryn Laughon, Associate Professor of Nursing

Research on power, violence and inequality raises ethical dilemmas for scholars, including how to tackle these issues in institutions of higher learning. Panelists will discuss how and why it is important to address the role of the University of Virginia in the eugenics movement and why scholars need to study its contemporary legacies, one of which is racial bias.

*Lunch will be served.

Megan Stewart

Megan Stewart–Lunch Research Talk “Civil War, Women and Social Development”

Megan StewartWed, April 26
12:00pm – 1:30pm
142 Nau Hall

What is the effect of women’s participation in civil wars? In contemporary domestic conflicts, insurgent groups approach women and women’s issues in vastly different ways: some rebel organizations allow women to hold only secondary, support positions within the insurgency, others insurgencies fully integrate women into all positions, including combat roles, while some insurgencies exclude women altogether. In this paper, we argue that how rebel groups approach women and choose to integrate them, or not, into the conflict has serious implications for civil war dynamics as well as social development both during and after fighting subsides. This effect, however, is mitigated by the roles women hold within an insurgency, the level of social services insurgents provide, and whether a conflict is ongoing. We test our argument using a combined dataset on insurgent social services and women in combat, and we find preliminary evidence in support of our claim. These results underscore the importance of insurgent social service institutions, as well as the importance of women in conflict settings.

Blee

Kathleen Blee: Ten Fallacies about Racist Extremists

Wednesday, April 19

Challenges and Opportunities in the Study of Racial Extremism
Research Lunch: 12-1:30
Location: Nau 142

Ten Fallacies about Racist Extremists
Public Talk: 3:30-5pm
Location: Clark Hall 107
Reception to follow

Kathleen Blee is Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Assoc. Dean for Graduate Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. She has published widely on the far-right, organized racism, and activist movements.  Her most recent books are Understanding Racist Activism: Theory, Methods, and Research (Routledge 2017).Democracy in the Making: How Activist Groups Form (Oxford University Press, 2012) and Inside Organized Racism: Women in the Hate Movement University of California Press, 2002).

Blee