Category Archives: Event

Susan Burton

Susan Burton Book Discussion

Susan BurtonThe Carter G. Woodson Institute & the Power, Violence & Inequality Collective present the Slavery Since Emancipation Speaker Series

Susan Burton is a widely recognized leader in the national criminal justice reform movement. She is author of the NAACP Image Award-winning book, Becoming Ms. Burton: From Prison to Recovery to Leading the Fight for Incarcerated Women, and founder of A New Way of Life Re-Entry Project.

Thursday, October 25, 2018
6:00–7:30 pm
Minor Hall, Rm. 125
Book signing 7:00–7:30 pm

Clark

Meredith Clark—We Wish to Tweet Our Own Cause: Black Twitter and the Power of Digital Counternarrative

Clark12:30 Wednesday,
4/25/18
Gibson 296
Lunch will be served

Meredith Clark is a former newspaper journalist whose research focuses on the intersections of race, media, and power. Her award-winning dissertation on Black Twitter landed her on The Root 100, the news website's list of the most influential African Americans in the country, in 2015. She's a regular contributor to Poynter.org's diversity column, and her research has been published in Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, the Journal of Social Media in Society, and New Media & Society. Dr. Clark is a graduate of Florida A&M University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and comes to UVA from the University of North Texas, where she spent three years as a tenure-track assistant professor of digital and print news.

Andrea Press and Professor of Media Studies, University of Virginia Francesca Tripodi Postdoctoral scholar, Data & Society Wednesday, April 18, 2018 12:30-2:00 296 Gibson Lunch will be served

Andrea Press & Francesca Tripodi—Swipe Right for Assault: Tinder, Technology, and the Problem of Campus Sexual Assault

Wednesday, April 18, 2018
12:30-2:00
296 Gibson
Lunch will be served

Andrea Press is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Media Studies and Sociology at the University of Virginia, and was the Executive Director of the Virginia Film Festival.

Francesca Tripodi is a postdoctoral fellow at Media & Society. She received her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Virginia in 2017, and next year will join Sociology & Anthropology Department at James Madison University as a tenure-track Assistant Professor of Sociology.

Triyang

2018 PVI Fellows Mini-Conference

Triyang
April 20, 2018
New Cabell Hall 236

Panel I: Limits of Justice; Limits of Law

Discussant: Nomi Dave, Department of Music

Brittany Crowley

Public Perceptions of Juvenile Defendants: Effects of Shackling and Race

Trina Kumodzi

The Human and Financial Costs of Fatal and Non-Fatal Firearm Injury in the United States: A Systematic Review

Macario Garcia

Mobility and Gendered Punishment in an American Southwest Prison

Panel II: Democracy and Difference

Kyle Chattelton

Sounding Out (My) Citizenship: A Manual for Performing Democracy in Charlottesville

Quinn Hirschi

How will the race-based violence that occurred in Charlottesville impact underrepresented minority students’ sense of belonging in a local high school?

Jennifer Simons

Strategic Tolerance from the Radical Right

Panel III: Sexual Violence

Discussant: Cori Field, Women, Gender & Sexuality

Paromita Sen

Straight from the Politicians Mouth: ‘Official’ Talk on Rape

Maya Hislop

Hearing (In)Justice: The Role of Voice in Gayl Jones’s Corregidora and State of North Carolina v. Joan Little

Lucy Guarnera

When Women Conceive in Rape: A Qualitative Investigation of Legal Choices, Experiences, and Outcomes

Panel IV: Responding to Violence

Indu Ohri

Some Cracks in the Structure, Left by the Last Bombing: Female War Trauma in Modernist Women’s Ghost Stories

Jeremy Sorgen

Violent Abstractions: Perception and Mediation in the Economy of Violence

Jieun Sung

Language Learning by Adult Refugees and Implications for Identity and Legitimacy

Hector Amaya

Hector Amaya—Public Anonymity in the Mexican Blogosphere

Hector AmayaWednesday, 04/11/2018
12:30–2:00
296 Gibson Hall
Speaker website

Abstract
The rules of participating in the Mexican blogosphere have changed because of violence. To remain safe, bloggers, including the makers of El Blog del Narco, have resorted to anonymity. This presentation analyzes this celebrated anonymous Mexican blog in relation both to the uses and misuses of anonymity and the connections between anonymity, displacement, and technology. Anonymity enables participation in the Mexican public sphere. Yet, I show, a public sphere based on anonymity is fraught and often disintegrating.

Bio
Hector Amaya is Professor of Media Studies at University of Virginia. He writes on Latino media studies, transnationalism, the cultural production of political identities, and Latin American film/media. In addition to publishing roughly twenty articles, he has single-authored two books: Screening Cuba: Film Criticism as Political Performance During the Cold War (2010: U. of Illinois P.) and Citizenship Excess: Latinos/as, Media, and the Nation (2013: NYUP). His third book, Trafficking: The Violent Restructuring of Publicity in Mexico and the United States, is forthcoming with Duke University Press.

Hakima Fassi Fihri

Hakima Fassi Fihri—Women’s Rights and Feminist Movements in Morocco: the Major Achievements and the Pending Challenges

Hakima Fassi Fihri12:00–2:00
3/30/2018
New Cabell Hall Room 144

Abstract

The talk addresses the legal outcomes of Moroccan feminism as a social movement, and the legal reforms taken in the past and those in progress now, in order to implement gender equality in Morocco. Liberal feminists have been struggling since the seventies for equal treatment by the laws towards all Moroccan citizens. Minor reforms were taken under King Hassan II, but they were largely considered by liberal feminists to be insufficient. Since 1999, Morocco accelerated its democratization process, and King Mohamed VI encouraged new legal reforms (Family Code and Nationality Code in 2004), bringing new hope to Moroccan feminists. The Constitution reform of 2011 was revolutionary, addressing the principles of gender equality, non discrimination and human rights. Liberal feminists praised these reforms, but they advocate for more. A significant signal was addressed when a socialist politician asked for gender equality in Morocco by challenging laws on polygamy and inheritance. Socialist feminists also ask for a legal framework for abortion. Such reforms imply a strong political willpower from Moroccan politicians. This is a major challenge, as Islam is “religion of the State”, and in Morocco the King is a religious leader. Moreover, the conservative Islamist party holds a large part in the Government/Parliament. Therefore, how to reach a balance, in legal reforms, between people’s urge to modern laws, and complying with islamic principles ?

Hakima Fassi Fihri

Hakima Fassi Fihri presenting Women’s Rights and Feminist Movements in Morocco: the Major Achievements and the Pending Challenges.

Hakima Fassi Fihri is a Moroccan scholar. She teaches Family Law in the School of Law at the International University of Rabat (IUR).  She serves also as the Director of International Relations and Partnerships at IUR, and is a member of its managing board.
She is a graduate from Rabat University School of Law, and holds a Master's Degree (DEA) in European Law from the University Pierre Mendès-France Grenoble II (France). 
She conducts research, publishes and teaches on women’s rights in Morocco, Moroccan Family Code readings, inheritance of women in Morocco, gender equality and women empowerment in Morocco and North Africa.
One of Hakima’s fields of interest relates to inter-religious marriages between Moroccan Muslim women and non-Muslim men who have not converted to Islam. She worked on inter-religious marriages as per Moroccan Law, based on the fact that the legal framework in Morocco on inter-religious marriages is inspired by religious rules, and that marriage between a Moroccan Muslim woman and a non-Muslim man who has not converted to Islam is not allowed in Morocco.
Hakima works on understanding how the religious rules (of islam) impact the laws governing family in Morocco, based on the fact that islam is the religion of the State according to the Moroccan Constitution, and the main source of Family law in Morocco is islamic law.
She believes that fair reforms of the family law and islamic rules are compatible, and she believes that gender equality and islam are not contradictory, provided that an appropriate/innovative reading of the islamic texts is performed.
Hakima is involved in family-oriented civil society activities in Morocco, on topics relating to women's rights and feminism in the Arab/Islamic world, and more generally, topics relating to women’s condition in islam (inheritance rules, inter-religious marriage,...), and Family law in Morocco.
Loïc Wacquant

Loïc Wacquant – Four “Peculiar Institutions” of Racial Rule: How They Differ, Why It Matters

Loïc WacquantThursday, March 29, 2018
3:30-5:00
Reception follows
Nau Hall 101

Talk Description: Four "peculiar institutions" have served to define and confine African Americans in U.S. society over the past four centuries: racialized slavery, the Jim Crow system of caste terrorism, the urban ghetto, and the hybrid formed by the concatenation of the hyperghetto and the carceral system. In this lecture, Professor Wacquant will discuss their similarities and differences and draw out the consequences of this historical model for the current scholarly and policy debates around race and citizenship.

Speaker Bio: Loïc Wacquant is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley, and Researcher at the Centre de sociologie européenne, Paris.

A MacArthur Prize Fellow, member of Harvard’s Society of Fellows, and recipient of the 2008 Lewis Coser Award for theoretical agenda-setting from the American Sociological Association, his interests span comparative urban inequality, the penal state, ethnoracial domination, embodiment, social theory, and the politics of reason. His books are translated in twenty languages and include Body and Soul: Notebooks of An Apprentice Boxer (2004, new expanded edition 2017) and the trilogy Urban Outcasts: A Comparative Sociology of Advanced Marginality (2008), Punishing the Poor: The New Government of Social Insecurity (2009), and Deadly Symbiosis: Race and the Rise of the Penal State (forthcoming). His most recent book is The Two Faces of the Ghetto (forthcoming with Polity Press).

WacquantThe video of this lecture is limited by permission. Please contact us if you would like access.

Loïc Wacquant

Loïc Wacquant – The Place of Violence in Jim Crow Rule

Loïc WacquantThursday, March 29, 2018
12:00-1:30
Gibson 296

 

 

Speaker Bio: Loïc Wacquant is Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley, and Researcher at the Centre de sociologie européenne, Paris.

A MacArthur Prize Fellow, member of Harvard’s Society of Fellows, and recipient of the 2008 Lewis Coser Award for theoretical agenda-setting from the American Sociological Association, his interests span comparative urban inequality, the penal state, ethnoracial domination, embodiment, social theory, and the politics of reason. His books are translated in twenty languages and include Body and Soul: Notebooks of An Apprentice Boxer (2004, new expanded edition 2017) and the trilogy Urban Outcasts: A Comparative Sociology of Advanced Marginality (2008), Punishing the Poor: The New Government of Social Insecurity (2009), and Deadly Symbiosis: Race and the Rise of the Penal State (forthcoming). His most recent book is The Two Faces of the Ghetto (forthcoming with Polity Press).

Jasbir Puar

Jasbir Puar—The Right to Maim: Debility, Capacity, Disability

Jasbir Puar3/14/2018
12:30–2:00
Gibson Hall 296

Prof. Puar’s luncheon research talk will be based on her recent book, The Right to Maim: Debility, Capacity, Disability (2017, Duke University Press).  The introduction to the book is available here.

Jasbir Puar, Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University, received her Ph.D. in Ethnic Studies from the University of California at Berkeley in 1999. Puar is the author of Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times (Duke University Press 2007), which won the 2007 Cultural Studies Book Award from the Association for Asian American Studies. Her edited volumes include “Queer Tourism: Geographies of Globalization” (GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies); and co-edited volumes on “Sexuality and Space” (Society and Space); “Interspecies” (Social Text); “Viral” (Women’s Studies Quarterly). Her articles have been published in many venues, including Gender, Place, and Culture; Radical History Review; Socialist Review; Feminist Studies, and Signs. She also writes for the popular press, including The Guardian, Huffington Post, Art India among others. Her work has been translated into Polish, French, German, Croatian, Swedish, and Danish. Her research has been funded by the Edward Said Chair at the American University of Beirut, a Rockefeller Fellowship at the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center, the Ford Foundation, and the Society for the Humanities at Cornell University, among others.

Jasbir Puar

Jasbir Puar: Homonationalism in Trump Times

Jasbir Puar3/14/2018
3:30–5:00
Wilson Hall 301

Jasbir Puar, Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies at Rutgers University, received her Ph.D. in Ethnic Studies from the University of California at Berkeley in 1999. Puar is the author of Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times (Duke University Press 2007), which won the 2007 Cultural Studies Book Award from the Association for Asian American Studies. Her edited volumes include “Queer Tourism: Geographies of Globalization” (GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies); and co-edited volumes on “Sexuality and Space” (Society and Space); “Interspecies” (Social Text); “Viral” (Women’s Studies Quarterly). Her articles have been published in many venues, including Gender, Place, and Culture; Radical History Review; Socialist Review; Feminist Studies, and Signs. She also writes for the popular press, including The Guardian, Huffington Post, Art India among others. Her work has been translated into Polish, French, German, Croatian, Swedish, and Danish. Her research has been funded by the Edward Said Chair at the American University of Beirut, a Rockefeller Fellowship at the Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies at the CUNY Graduate Center, the Ford Foundation, and the Society for the Humanities at Cornell University, among others.