Category Archives: Event

Shireen Hassim

Shireen Hassim – Landscape for a Rebel Woman: Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, Violence and the Intimacies of Gender in South African Politics

Shireen HassimFebruary 26, 2018
3:30–5:00
Reception follows
Minor Hall, Room 110

Shireen Hassim is a professor of political studies at the University of the Witwatersrand (Wits), currently based at WISER (Wits Institute for Social and Economic Research). She has written and edited several books, including No Shortcuts to Power: African Women in Politics and Policy Making (Zed Books, 2003) and Go Home or Die Here: Violence, Xenophobia, and the Reinvention of Difference in South Africa (Wits University Press, 2008). Her book, Women’s Organizations and Democracy in South Africa: Contesting Authority (University of Wisconsin Press, 2006), won the Victoria Shuck Award from the American Political Science Association. Her most recent book is The ANC Women’s League (Ohio University Press, 2014). Hassim obtained her PhD from York University (Canada). She is a member of the steering committee for the Women’s Living History Monument, which is developing the first museum of women’s history in Africa, and the first black woman full professor of political science in South Africa. She sits on the board of the Human Sciences Research Council and on the Wits council. She is a member of the Academy of Science of South Africa and an elected member of its ASSAf Council.

Chris Lebron

Chris Lebron: Black Love and Rage in America: The Burden of Hope

Chris Lebron Wed, February 7 3:30–5:00 301 Wilson Hall Reception to followWed, February 7
3:30–5:00
301 Wilson Hall
Reception to follow

Chris Lebron is Associate Professor of Philosophy. He specializes in political philosophy, social theory, the philosophy of race, and democratic ethics. His work has focused on bridging the divide between analytic liberalism and the virtue ethics tradition. His first book, The Color of Our Shame: Race and Justice In Our Time (OUP 2013) won the American Political Science Association Foundations of Political Theory First Book Prize. His second book, The Making of Black Lives Matter: A Brief History of An Idea (OUP 2017) , offers a brief intellectual history of the black lives matter social movement. Lebron has also been an active public intellectual, writing for The New York Times's philosophy column, The Stone and for Boston Review, in addition to other outlets.

Chris Lebron

Chris Lebron: The Reversal of the Lost Race Narrative: Deploying Afrofuturism to Make Sense of the Resurgence of White Identity

Chris Lebron02/07/2018
12:30PM–2:00
Gibson Hall 296

Chris Lebron is Associate Professor of Philosophy. He specializes in political philosophy, social theory, the philosophy of race, and democratic ethics. His work has focused on bridging the divide between analytic liberalism and the virtue ethics tradition. His first book, The Color of Our Shame: Race and Justice In Our Time (OUP 2013) won the American Political Science Association Foundations of Political Theory First Book Prize. His second book, The Making of Black Lives Matter: A Brief History of An Idea (OUP 2017) , offers a brief intellectual history of the black lives matter social movement. Lebron has also been an active public intellectual, writing for The New York Times’s philosophy column, The Stone and for Boston Review, in addition to other outlets.

Paper is available here.

Melissa Torres

Dr. Melissa I. M. Torres – Cause and Effect: Oppression, Exploitation, and Human Trafficking

Melissa TorresFebruary 8, 2018
3:30-5:00 (a reception will follow)
Minor Hall, Rm. 110

This lecture will explore the history of slavery and racial oppression from a policy standpoint. Discussion will focus on how systemic oppression has historically led to the current factors tied to the exploitation of minority and immigrant populations for commercial sex and labor. The lecture will take a human rights approach with a racial justice lens.

Dr. Melissa Irene Maldonado Torres is Director of the Human Trafficking Research Portfolio at the Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault at the University of Texas at Austin. She served as the Subject Matter Expert on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ healthcare professional’s response to human trafficking program, an initiative of President Obama’s Federal Strategic Action Plan on Services for Victims. She teaches classes on human trafficking at both the University of Texas at Austin and the University of Houston. She serves as the human trafficking expert for various academic studies in the U.S. and Latin America. Over the last 10 years, her research has included the trafficking of women from Latin America for sexual exploitation, policy analysis on the protection of domestic minor sex trafficking survivors, labor abuse and exploitation faced by undocumented immigrants, assessments on displacement and knowledge of trafficking risks in indigenous communities, and exploring the demand side of sex trafficking.

Kathy Cramer, director of the Morgridge Center for Public Service and professor of political science, is pictured in her office at the Red Gym (Armory and Gymnasium) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on July 1, 2015. (Photo by Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)

Katherine Cramer : The Politics of Resentment in the Contemporary United States

Tuesday
November 14, 2017
3:30–5:00
Reception will follow Campbell 153

Katherine Cramer is a professor in the Department of Political Science and Director of the Morgridge Center for Public Service. Her work focuses on the way people in the United States make sense of politics and their place in it. She is known for her innovative approach to the study of public opinion, in which she invites herself into the conversations of groups of people to listen to the way they understand public affairs. Her book, The Politics of Resentment: Rural Consciousness in Wisconsin and the Rise of Scott Walker, examines rural resentment toward cities and its implications for contemporary politics (University of Chicago Press, 2016). She has also published as Katherine Cramer Walsh and is the author of Talking about Race: Community Dialogues and the Politics of Difference, and Talking about Politics: Informal Groups and Social Identity in American Life. She is the recipient of the 2017 APSA Qualitative and Multi-Method Research section Giovanni Sartori Award for the best book developing or using qualitative methods published in 2016, among other awards.

Kathy Cramer, director of the Morgridge Center for Public Service and professor of political science, is pictured in her office at the Red Gym (Armory and Gymnasium) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison on July 1, 2015. (Photo by Jeff Miller/UW-Madison)

Katherine Cramer: Expanding the Study of Public Opinion to Incorporate Qualitative Methods

Expanding the Study of Public Opinion to Incorporate Qualitative MethodsWednesday
November 15, 2017
11:30
Informal Lunch
Gibson 296

Lunch discussion of the use of qualitative methods for the study of public opinion, and in the social sciences more generally.

Katherine Cramer is a professor in the Department of Political Science and Director of the Morgridge Center for Public Service. Her work focuses on the way people in the United States make sense of politics and their place in it. She is known for her innovative approach to the study of public opinion, in which she invites herself into the conversations of groups of people to listen to the way they understand public affairs. Her book, The Politics of Resentment: Rural Consciousness in Wisconsin and the Rise of Scott Walker, examines rural resentment toward cities and its implications for contemporary politics (University of Chicago Press, 2016). She has also published as Katherine Cramer Walsh and is the author of Talking about Race: Community Dialogues and the Politics of Difference, and Talking about Politics: Informal Groups and Social Identity in American Life. She is the recipient of the 2017 APSA Qualitative and Multi-Method Research section Giovanni Sartori Award for the best book developing or using qualitative methods published in 2016, among other awards.

Lawrie Balfour

Lawrie Balfour: Where Do We Go From Here?: Martin Luther King, Jr., Reparations, and Emancipation Today

Lawrie BalfourFriday, November 3, 2017
3:30-5:00
Nau Hall Room 101

America owes a debt of justice which it has only begun to pay.”
—Martin Luther King, Jr.

King made this statement after the landmark Civil Rights legislation of the 1960s. His rejection of the idea that legal change was enough to undo the past, present, and future harms of white supremacy speaks to us today. Focusing on Where Do We Go From Here, this talk will explore King’s philosophy of time and indebtedness. It will make a case for reparations as a way to come to terms with the past and fulfill our obligations to future generations whose inheritance is in our hands.

Robert Vitalis

Robert Vitalis – Lunch Talk: White World Order, Black Power Politics: Race in the Making of American International Relations

Robert VitalisWed, October 18
12:30pm – 2:00pm
New Cabell Hall, Room 236

Robert Vitalis has taught political science at the University of Pennsylvania since 1999. The London Guardian named his America's Kingdom: Mythmaking on the Saudi Oil Frontier, a book of the year in 2006. His last book, White World Order, Black Power Politics (Cornell University Press, 2015) moved away from the Middle East to explore the unwritten history of racism and imperialism in American disciplinary international relations and the recovery of its critical “Howard School” tradition. He is on sabbatical in 2017-2018 while working on a new book, Oilcraft: Folkways of Imperialism and Antiimperialism in the Twenty First Century, forthcoming from Stanford University Press.

Preston Reynolds

Preston Reynolds – Eugenics at UVA and Its Impact on Race and Gender Inequity

Preston ReynoldsWednesday, September 27
3:30pm – 5:00pm
Minor Hall 125

Eugenics permeated the culture of the University of Virginia for over 100 years through the research, writings, and teaching of some of its most prominent leaders. Eugenics laid the intellectual foundation for discrimination with regard to race, gender, nationality, intellectual ability, and socio-economic status. The impact of the eugenics metaphor was felt in every aspect of life, and in every corner of the Commonwealth, in part, through the work of UVA faculty, and their collaboration with nationally renowned eugenicists. This lecture will explore the history of eugenics at UVA, reflect on the damage the eugenics paradigm had on diversity and health disparities, and outline areas of future research.

Preston Reynolds, MD, PhD, is nationally recognized as a scholar, physician, educator, and activist leader. She teaches and conducts research on professionalism, global health and human rights, health disparities, and the history of race discrimination in health care and health professions education in the US. Professor Reynolds currently serves as faculty in the Carter G. Woodson Institute, Associate Director of the Center for Health Disparities, and Associate Chair for Professionalism and Diversity in the Department of Medicine.


See also these articles about the renaming of UVa buildings formerly named for prominent eugenicists:

https://www.news.virginia.edu/content/pinn-hall-dedication-highlights-namesake-and-future-medical-research

https://www.news.virginia.edu/content/uvas-lewis-house-renamed-yen-house-honor-noted-chinese-graduate