PVI Mini Conference

PVI Fellows Mini-Conference

PVI Mini ConferenceFriday, May 5, 2017
8:30–1:45
236 New Cabell Hall

8:30-9:00 Continental Breakfast

9:00-9:15 Welcome
PVI co-Directors, Denise Walsh and Nicholas Winter

9:15-9:30 Opening Remarks
Professor Charlotte Patterson, Psychology and Women, Gender & Sexuality

9:30-11:00 PVI Fellows Panel
Communicating Power, Violence & Inequality
Annie Galvin, Kara Fitzgibbon, Dannah Dennis, Kelli Shermeyer Discussant: Camilla Fojas, Associate Professor of Media Studies

11-11:15 Coffee break

11:15-12:45 PVI Fellows Panel
Education, Power, Violence & Inequality
Kimalee Dickerson, Brooke Dinsmore, Jennifer Poole, Andrew Frankel
Discussant: Rachel Wahl, Assistant Professor, Curry School

12:45-1:45 Panel
Ethics: Eugenics and its Legacy at UVA Today*
Daniel Cavanaugh, Health Sciences Library
Caitlyn Dreisbach, RN Clinician
Kathryn Laughon, Associate Professor of Nursing

Research on power, violence and inequality raises ethical dilemmas for scholars, including how to tackle these issues in institutions of higher learning. Panelists will discuss how and why it is important to address the role of the University of Virginia in the eugenics movement and why scholars need to study its contemporary legacies, one of which is racial bias.

*Lunch will be served.

Megan Stewart

Megan Stewart–Lunch Research Talk “Civil War, Women and Social Development”

Megan StewartWed, April 26
12:00pm – 1:30pm
142 Nau Hall

What is the effect of women’s participation in civil wars? In contemporary domestic conflicts, insurgent groups approach women and women’s issues in vastly different ways: some rebel organizations allow women to hold only secondary, support positions within the insurgency, others insurgencies fully integrate women into all positions, including combat roles, while some insurgencies exclude women altogether. In this paper, we argue that how rebel groups approach women and choose to integrate them, or not, into the conflict has serious implications for civil war dynamics as well as social development both during and after fighting subsides. This effect, however, is mitigated by the roles women hold within an insurgency, the level of social services insurgents provide, and whether a conflict is ongoing. We test our argument using a combined dataset on insurgent social services and women in combat, and we find preliminary evidence in support of our claim. These results underscore the importance of insurgent social service institutions, as well as the importance of women in conflict settings.

Blee

Kathleen Blee: Ten Fallacies about Racist Extremists

Wednesday, April 19

Challenges and Opportunities in the Study of Racial Extremism
Research Lunch: 12-1:30
Location: Nau 142

Ten Fallacies about Racist Extremists
Public Talk: 3:30-5pm
Location: Clark Hall 107
Reception to follow

Kathleen Blee is Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Assoc. Dean for Graduate Studies at the University of Pittsburgh. She has published widely on the far-right, organized racism, and activist movements.  Her most recent books are Understanding Racist Activism: Theory, Methods, and Research (Routledge 2017).Democracy in the Making: How Activist Groups Form (Oxford University Press, 2012) and Inside Organized Racism: Women in the Hate Movement University of California Press, 2002).

Blee

Dorthy Roberts

Dorothy Roberts: A Diversity Discussion: The Problem with Race-Based Medicine

Dorthy RobertsFriday, February 17

Co-sponsored by the  School of Medicine’s Office of Diversity and the Power, Violence & Inequality Collective in the College of Arts & Sciences

11:30 – Lunch
12:00 – Keynote
12:40 – Q&A
1:00 – Book Signing
Pinn Hall Auditorium
Pre-registration required

Bio
Dorothy Roberts is the 14th Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor and George A. Weiss University Professor of Law & Sociology at University of Pennsylvania, with joint appointments in the Departments of Africana Studies and Sociology and the Law School, where she is the inaugural Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights. She is also Founding Director of the Penn Program on Race, Science & Society. An internationally recognized scholar, public intellectual, and social justice advocate, Roberts has written and lectured extensively on the interplay of race and gender in legal issues and has been a leader in transforming thinking on reproductive health, child welfare, and bioethics. She is author of Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and the Meaning of Liberty (Random House/Pantheon, 1997; Twentieth Anniversary Edition, Vintage 2017), Shattered Bonds: The Color of Child Welfare (Basic Books/Civitas, 2002), and Fatal Invention: How Science, Politics, and Big Business Re-create Race in the Twenty-First Century (New Press, 2011) and more than 100 articles and book chapters, as well as co-editor of six books on constitutional law and gender. She serves on the board of directors of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, and her work has been supported by the American Council of Learned Societies, National Science Foundation, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Harvard Program on Ethics & the Professions, and Stanford Center for the Comparative Studies in Race & Ethnicity. Recent recognitions of her work include the Society of Family Planning 2016 Lifetime Achievement Award and American Psychiatric Association 2015 Solomon Carter Fuller Award.

Photo by Chris Crisman

 

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, Princeton University

External Speaker

Wednesday, March 29

Talks Sponsored by the Power, Violence & Inequality Collective
Research Lunch Talk: 12-1:30
Title: “You Can’t Fix a Broken Foundation: Black Women’s Housing in the 1970s”
Place: Gibson 142
Public Talk: 3:30-5:00

Title: “Black Lives Matter in the Trump Era”
Place: Minor Hall 125
Reception to follow

Biography

Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor is author of From #BlackLivesMatter to Black Liberation, published by Haymarket Books in January 2016. The book surveys the historical and contemporary ravages of racism and persistent structural inequality, including mass incarceration, housing discrimination, police violence, and unemployment. Taylor is the recipient of the 2016 Cultural Freedom Especially Notable Book Award from the Lannan Foundation.

Taylor’s interests are broadly in the fields of race and public policy, Black politics and racial inequality in the United States.  She is Assistant Professor of African American Studies at Princeton University.  Taylor’s writing has been published in Souls: A Critical Journal of Black Politics, Culture and Society, The Guardian, Los Angeles Times, Boston Review, The New Republic, AlJazeera America, Jacobin, In These Times, New Politics, The International Socialist Review and other publications. She is currently writing a book titled Race for Profit: Black Housing and the Urban Crisis in the 1970s, under contract with the University of North Carolina Press in their Justice, Power and Politics series.  Taylor received her PhD in African American Studies at Northwestern University in 2013 and is currently an Assistant Professor in African American Studies at Princeton University.

Global History of Black Girlhood Conference

Global History of Black Girlhood Conference, Keynote Panel

Global History of  Black Girlhood ConferenceExternal Speaker

March 17, 2017
Friday, 6:30-8:00 PM
Minor Hall Room 125

Global Black Girl Politics: Activists Reflect on Youth, Justice, and Girlhoods

Janaé E Bonsu, National Public Policy Chair of BYP100.

Beverley Palesa Ditsie, Filmmaker, Activist, Co-Founder of Gay and Lesbian Organisation of the Witwatersrand (GLOW), South Africa

Denise Oliver-Velez, Adjunct Professor of Anthropology and Women’s Studies, SUNY- New Palz, U.S.A.; former member of Young Lords Party and Black Panther Party

Phindile Kunene, Curriculum Developer, Tshisimani Center for Activist Education, South Africa; former member of Young Communist League of South Africa and South African Student CongressChair, Claudrena Harold, Associate Professor of African-American History, University of Virginia

Reception to follow

Women Moving Forward

Women Moving Forward Panel
January 18th, 2017 from 5:30 to 7pm EST
Darden Grounds; Classroom 50
 
There is no doubt that the 2016 US Presidential election was a polarizing experience for many and, regardless of which candidate you supported, we all are beginning to think about things a little differently in the post-election America.  In the wake of the election and in the spirit of the MLK Day, Darden GWIB along with the Power, Violence and Inequality Collective, with the support of the Office of Diversity Initiatives, is hosting a “Women Moving Forward” panel during the evening of Wednesday, January 18th.  The theme of this panel is to not only discuss gender dynamics in the election, but also identify ways we all can move forward after the divisive election and help make sense in our new reality, with a particular focus on what this means for women and other marginalized groups. Panelists include Cori FieldDenise WalshAbby Palko and Catherine Spear

Risk and Resistance in Response to Women’s Increased Civic and Political Participation in the Global South

Internal Talk

Title: “Risk and Resistance in Response to Women’s Increased Civic and Political Participation in the Global South,” funded by USAID/IIE

January 25, 2017
Wednesday, 12-1:30

Research Talk: Denise Walsh, Vanessa Ochs, Swati Chawla, Dannah Dennis, Paromita Sen, and Catalina Vallejo, University of Virginia

Lunch included

Location TBA

Widespread agreement exists among scholars and activists that women’s civic and political participation is crucial for democracy and development. Nevertheless, obstacles to women’s participation persist. What are the most effective strategies for increasing women’s participation in civil society and politics? When these strategies are adopted, what type of opposition do women face as a result, and how can it best be mitigated? This USAID-commissioned review of the literature identifies seven effective strategies for encouraging women’s participation. It also finds that low to moderate resistance to women’s participation is ubiquitous across sites and countries. Most significantly, we find that scholars have failed to systematically analyze opposition to women’s participation in politics and civil society. We thus explain what scholars do know about opposition to women’s participation  and identify critical areas for future research.

 

Women Moving Forward at Darden

There is no doubt that the 2016 US Presidential election was a polarizing experience for many and, regardless of which candidate you supported, we all are beginning to think about things a little differently in the post-election America.  In the wake of the election and in the spirit of the MLK Day, Darden GWIB along with the Power, Violence and Inequality Collective, with the support of the Office of Diversity Initiatives, is hosting a “Women Moving Forward” panel during the evening of Wednesday, January 18th.  The theme of this panel is to not only discuss gender dynamics in the election, but also identify ways we all can move forward after the divisive election and help make sense in our new reality, with a particular focus on what this means for women and other marginalized groups. Panelists include Cori Field, Denise Walsh, Abby Palko and Catherine Spear.