Global History of Black Girlhood Conference

Global History of Black Girlhood Conference, Keynote Panel

Global History of  Black Girlhood ConferenceExternal Speaker

March 17, 2017
Friday, 6:30-8:00 PM
Minor Hall Room 125

Global Black Girl Politics: Activists Reflect on Youth, Justice, and Girlhoods

Janaé E Bonsu, National Public Policy Chair of BYP100.

Beverley Palesa Ditsie, Filmmaker, Activist, Co-Founder of Gay and Lesbian Organisation of the Witwatersrand (GLOW), South Africa

Denise Oliver-Velez, Adjunct Professor of Anthropology and Women’s Studies, SUNY- New Palz, U.S.A.; former member of Young Lords Party and Black Panther Party

Phindile Kunene, Curriculum Developer, Tshisimani Center for Activist Education, South Africa; former member of Young Communist League of South Africa and South African Student CongressChair, Claudrena Harold, Associate Professor of African-American History, University of Virginia

Reception to follow

Women Moving Forward

Women Moving Forward Panel
January 18th, 2017 from 5:30 to 7pm EST
Darden Grounds; Classroom 50
 
There is no doubt that the 2016 US Presidential election was a polarizing experience for many and, regardless of which candidate you supported, we all are beginning to think about things a little differently in the post-election America.  In the wake of the election and in the spirit of the MLK Day, Darden GWIB along with the Power, Violence and Inequality Collective, with the support of the Office of Diversity Initiatives, is hosting a “Women Moving Forward” panel during the evening of Wednesday, January 18th.  The theme of this panel is to not only discuss gender dynamics in the election, but also identify ways we all can move forward after the divisive election and help make sense in our new reality, with a particular focus on what this means for women and other marginalized groups. Panelists include Cori FieldDenise WalshAbby Palko and Catherine Spear

Risk and Resistance in Response to Women’s Increased Civic and Political Participation in the Global South

Internal Talk

Title: “Risk and Resistance in Response to Women’s Increased Civic and Political Participation in the Global South,” funded by USAID/IIE

January 25, 2017
Wednesday, 12-1:30

Research Talk: Denise Walsh, Vanessa Ochs, Swati Chawla, Dannah Dennis, Paromita Sen, and Catalina Vallejo, University of Virginia

Lunch included

Location TBA

Widespread agreement exists among scholars and activists that women’s civic and political participation is crucial for democracy and development. Nevertheless, obstacles to women’s participation persist. What are the most effective strategies for increasing women’s participation in civil society and politics? When these strategies are adopted, what type of opposition do women face as a result, and how can it best be mitigated? This USAID-commissioned review of the literature identifies seven effective strategies for encouraging women’s participation. It also finds that low to moderate resistance to women’s participation is ubiquitous across sites and countries. Most significantly, we find that scholars have failed to systematically analyze opposition to women’s participation in politics and civil society. We thus explain what scholars do know about opposition to women’s participation  and identify critical areas for future research.

 

Women Moving Forward at Darden

There is no doubt that the 2016 US Presidential election was a polarizing experience for many and, regardless of which candidate you supported, we all are beginning to think about things a little differently in the post-election America.  In the wake of the election and in the spirit of the MLK Day, Darden GWIB along with the Power, Violence and Inequality Collective, with the support of the Office of Diversity Initiatives, is hosting a “Women Moving Forward” panel during the evening of Wednesday, January 18th.  The theme of this panel is to not only discuss gender dynamics in the election, but also identify ways we all can move forward after the divisive election and help make sense in our new reality, with a particular focus on what this means for women and other marginalized groups. Panelists include Cori Field, Denise Walsh, Abby Palko and Catherine Spear.

Mimi Arbeit

Mimi Arbeit: Examining the Work of “Consent” through a Systems Perspective: At the U.S. Military Academy at West Point

New Cabell Hall Room 236
Nov. 15, 12-1:30

With increasing attention to epidemic rates of sexual assault in the military and within higher education, the idea of sexual consent is being leveraged by activists, educators, policymakers, and scholars to identify what sexual violence is and how it is produced. Does the concept of sexual consent have transformative potential? In this talk, I will present findings from a grounded theory study of sexual relationships and sexual violence prevention at the United States Military Academy at West Point. I will use these findings to illustrate how the concept of sexual consent operates at multiple layers of the developmental system: the personal, the institutional, and the sociopolitical. I will then ask how, if at all, the concept of consent can be used to interrupt existing power structures that produce and promote sexual violence. The limitations of the concept of consent, and the ways in which a focus on consent at times functions to increase individual vulnerability to violence, will also be considered.

Carissa Harris

Carissa Harris

Carissa HarrisLuncheon talk hosted by the Power, Violence and Inequality Collective

Friday, October 14, 12:00 – 1:30

A brief lecture followed by Q&A (moderated by Denise Walsh)

Carissa Harris is Assistant Professor of English at Temple University. Her research interests include the history of obscenity, illicit speech, gender, and sexual violence in late-medieval English literature (full bio here). She has recently published an article in the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies entitled “Rape Narrative, Courtly Critique, and the Pedagogy of Sexual Negotiation in the Middle English Pastourelle” (May 2016) (abstract here) and is currently completing a book manuscript titled Obscene Pedagogies: Transgressive Talk and Sexual Education in Late Medieval Britain.

Sarah Cook

Sarah Cook: On the Precipice of Change: 60 Years of Campus Rape Research

Sarah Cook2016-2017 COLLOQUIUM SERIES Co-sponsored by the Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics and Women, Gender and Sexuality presents Sarah Cook, Georgia State University, Distinguished Alumni Lecturer.

On the Precipice of Change: 60 Years of Campus Rape Research
With President Obama’s White House Task Force on Keeping Students Safe from Sexual Assault, the higher education community has finally begun to address the problem. Social science research, the bulk of it from psychology, can inform institutional understanding of the problem and requisite changes. In this talk, I weave 60 years of data on what we know about the nature and scope of victimization and perpetration, how students understand consent, and how as institutions we can use compassion and still meet federal regulations for Title IX! I will also describe several collaborative initiatives by psychological scientists to advance knowledge on campus climate.

Friday, October 14, 2016
3:30 p.m.
Gilmer 190

Coffee at 3:15pm. Reception will be held after the talk.

Antonia Abbey, Causes of Sexual Aggression: A view from Psychology

abbey-1-jpgAntonia Abbey is Professor and Area Chair of Cognitive, Developmental and Social Psychology at Wayne State University, where she runs the Social Perceptions and Health Lab. Her research applies social psychological theory and research to health issues, including long-standing interests in understanding and preventing violence against women and in the relationship between alcohol and sexual assault. She is the author of over 100 journal articles and book chapters, has served on numerous scientific panels, and consults to the Department of Defense on their Sexual Assault Prevention Strategy, released in 2014.

Dr. Abbey’s public lecture will be held Friday, September 23, 3:30-5:00 in 125 Minor Hall, at the University of Virginia.

Her website is here.

 

Graduate Research Fellows RFP

The PVI is excited to announce our first Graduate Research Fellows Program for 2016-17.

Graduate research fellows will receive funding to support their research during the 2016-17 academic year and will participate as a cohort in the activities of the PVI. Ph.D. students in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Curry School are eligible to apply. We anticipate awarding 7–10 fellowships of $1,000–1,500 each.

Applications are due on September 9; the full RFP is available here.

Evelyn Alsultany coming to Grounds on April 20!

We are very excited to bring Evelyn Alsultany to Grounds on Wednesday, April 20. 
Professor Alsultany is an associate professor in the Department of American Culture at the University of Michigan and Director of Arab and Muslim American Studies. She teaches courses on media representations, U.S. cultural and racial politics, and Arab and Muslim Americans.  She is the author of Arabs and Muslims in the Media: Race and Representation after 9/11 and co-editor of two volumes: Arab and Arab American Feminisms: Gender, Violence, and Belonging and Between the Middle East and the Americas: The Cultural Politics of Diaspora. She is guest curator of the Arab American National Museum's online exhibit, “Reclaiming Identity: Dismantling Arab Stereotypes,” that can be viewed at www.arabstereotypes.org. For more information, see http://EvelynAlsultany.com.

Professor Alsultany will give a public lecture and a lunchtime research talk.  Please contact us if you would like to meet with her during her visit.